Scientific Advisory Board

Michael S. Brown

Chairman

photo of Michael BrownDr. Brown is Paul J. Thomas Professor of Molecular Genetics and Director of the Erik Jonsson Center for Molecular Genetics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. Together with his long-time colleague, Dr. Joseph L. Goldstein, he discovered the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, which controls the level of cholesterol in blood and in cells. They showed that mutations in this receptor cause Familial Hypercholesterolemia, a disorder that leads to premature heart attacks in one out of every 500 people in most populations. They have received many awards for this work, including the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology (1985), the Albert D. Lasker Prize in Basic Medical Research (1985) and the U.S. National Medal of Science (1988). He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, Royal Society (London), the Association of American Physicians and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Michael Fischbach

photo of Michael FischbachProf. Fischbach is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences at UCSF and a member of the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3). Prof. Fischbach is a leading expert in the identification and characterization of natural products from the microbiome. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, and spent two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital before coming to UCSF. Prof. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's New Innovator Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, and the Young Investigator Grant for Probiotics Research from the Global Probiotics Council.

K. Christopher Garcia

Photo of K. Christopher GarciaProf. Garcia is a Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and of Structural Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in biophysics from the Johns Hopkins University and completed post-doctoral work at Genentech and at the Scripps Research Institute before joining Stanford University in 1999. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2012 and is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2005. Prof. Garcia is a leading scientist studying the structural biology of cytokine receptor recognition and activation, and probing cytokine signaling mechanisms using protein engineering. His research has identified new paradigms for recognition and activation of a variety of receptors that play critical roles in autoimmunity, cancer, neural growth and repair, and blood pressure regulation.

Joseph L. Goldstein

photo of Joseph L. GoldsteinDr. Goldstein is Regental Professor and Chairman of the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, and he also holds the Paul J. Thomas Chair in Medicine and the Julie and Louis A. Beecherl Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science. He and his long-time colleague, Dr. Michael S. Brown, have worked together for the last 40 years on the genetics and regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Their discovery of the LDL receptor as the major molecule regulating cholesterol metabolism and its genetic disruption in the human disease Familial Hypercholesterolemia have been recognized by their receipt of numerous awards, including the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1985), the Albert D. Lasker Award in Basic Medical Research (1985) and the U.S. National Medal of Science (1988). He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Royal Society (London), the Association of American Physicians and the American Philosophical Society.

Robert D. Schreiber

photo of Francesco Rubino

Prof. Schreiber is the Alumni Endowed Professor of Pathology and Immunology and Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He is also co-leader of the Tumor Immunology Program of Washington University’s Siteman Comprehensive Cancer Center, Director of the Washington University Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs and an Associate Director of the Scientific Advisory Council to the Cancer Research Institute. His career has focused on elucidating the biochemistry and molecular cell biology of cytokines and defining the role they play in promoting immune responses to cancer. Prof. Schreiber’s work has led to a generalized appreciation of the profound effect of immunity on developing tumors and has contributed critical conceptual and practical support to the fields of tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy. Recently, he and his colleagues have pioneered the use of genomics approaches to define the antigenic targets of cancer immuneediting and elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the process. Prof. Schreiber was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2010 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2013.